“The intersection between a cultural counterrevolution against the use of metaphors and an odd pocket of pedophiles.”

Recently, an unknown member of the appropriately named Crash Override Network  group (yes, CON), leaked their chat logs (they are redacted for personal information, phones numbers, and such things.) Being a respected and serious group dedicated to fighting harassment and online abuse, one would expect their chat logs being full of open discussions about their daily work, the people they are helping, the costs of their programs, their setbacks and daily issues, and occasional ramblings into unrelated subjects (we are all human, after all.) Yeah, well, I guess so:

[23/12/2014, 1:02:36 PM] Randi Harper: feeding men their own dicks in arenas after i rip 
them off

Edit: You can read the original leak and the context of those quotes here.

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The pitfalls of worldbuilding.

You are hungry, but there is a bakery near your place, so you go up and leave your home [you are a ratman, and you live in the sewers], following that delicious smell.

“Hello, Mr. Ratman,” says the fine lady behind the counter. “May I help you?”

You can choose one of these answers:

a) Just ask for a classic butter croissant.

b) Ask for the same croissant, and explain to her why you like them so much, perhaps illustrating the point with a humorous or beautiful short story about your croissant-filled past. It’s a small town (but with big sewers!), though, so people don’t mind a bit of small talk.

c) Ask for the croissant, and then go rambling for half an hour about its origins during the Siege of Vienna, and about all the European kings who have ever suffered from lactose intolerance.

Continue reading “The pitfalls of worldbuilding.”

Memetic entities are breaching the barrier between realities.

Although I am not American, I earnestly follow American politics as much as I can. Not the daily grind of journalism and punditry, of course, but the cultural shift that is also happening. As with all cultural changes, they start at the fringes, and then they become more normalized and streamlined. That happened today when Hillary Clinton, during a speech pointing out Donald Trump’s associations (real or not) with racist and (ultra)nationalist elements, condemned the somewhat obscure “alt-right” movement (not that obscure anymore), and then someone screamed “Pepe!

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SocJus Thesaurus: “Reinforcement”, or how A. Sarkeesian misuses psychology.

In the first installment of my Social Justice thesaurus (about the world “problematic”) I said I would follow a certain structure when writing these posts. I don’t remember what I said, so I’ll ignore that and I’ll write this one following whatever order or structure may strike my fancy.

While the overuse and abuse of the word problematic are easy to detect, and it’s almost like a tribal badge for social justice berserkers, I suspect few people have realized that the verb “reinforce” (and, very rarely, the noun “reinforcement”) is a staple of social justice media/entertainment criticism. It is, however, a key concept of Social Justice rhetoric, and many of their arguments would be meaningless without it. If you pay attention, you will see that the word (or a synonym) appears in almost all social justice texts. Why? Because the key trick in any media criticism is to link media “exposure” to a behavioral effect or a change in beliefs, and reinforcement is the magical link. Basically: watch or play this, and it will corrupt you.

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Review: Cirsova #2

Cirsova 2
Cover art by Jabari Weathers.

Two months ago I reviewed the first issue of Cirsova. For those who don’t know about it, Cirsova is a magazine that specializes in fantasy inspired by the golden era of fantasy and science fiction (the distinction was blurry sometimes.) It also looks back to the pulps and tries to regain that spirit of weirdness and wonder that eludes contemporary fiction. The second issue is already here, and I can tell one thing right away: This second issue is even better.

 

I really liked the first issue, but I thought it still could be improved. It had a great variety of stories, though, so all kinds of readers could find something for them.

On the other hand, while I quickly realized which ones were my favorites stories, I can’t say the same about this second issue. But not because they aren’t any good, but because not only have the best one got better, the “average” has also improved.

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Winnie the Problematic [Reblog]

 

hailcthulhu
Source: rpgcodex.net

 

PC Bushi

The other day I stumbled upon a post at Black Gate wherein the writer lamented his failings as a compassionate human being. You see, he decided to have another look at Piers Anthony’s Xanth books, which he had picked up in 6th grade and then again during his teenage years. Upon returning to the series as a mature adult, presumably after having been afforded the benefits and enlightenment of modern education, he realized how misogynistic Anthony’s writing is. Embarrassing as it is, our BG blogger hadn’t picked up on this as a child and had failed to be appropriately offended. He properly swears that he will not be recommending Xanth to his son, anyone female, or…well, anyone. Furthermore he will have his copies destroyed (making sure they are recycled, of course) rather than donating them to the local thrift shop, ensuring no one will read this smut.

Capture.PNG

I must say, bravo…

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Babylon 5: Remembering those we lost.

Jerry Doyle , best known for playing Security Chief Michael Garibaldi on Babylon 5, died last Tuesday. He is the last in a too long list of Babylon 5 actors who have died before their time, some of them quite young.

I haven’t watched Babylon 5 in many years, so I don’t know how it holds up after so much time, but it quickly became a very important and significant part of my youth. Babylon 5 run from 1994 to 1998, but I first knew of its existence in July 2001, when (I think) it was first showed in Spain, on the Catalan TV channel Canal 33. I was twelve years old, I was on summer vacation, and I already had a passion for Sci-Fi shows, so I quickly fell in love with it. I’ll admit, however, that my first reaction to it had been one of laughter.

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